Open Roads Radio forum for Ham, Amateur Radio and RV camping


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-27-2015, 04:21 PM   #1
NN5I
Carl, nn5i
 
NN5I's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 1,407
Default Bibb

It's not every day that I encounter a word I don't know. When I do, I look it up. This habit has served me well.

Today I encountered a new word, bibb. I looked it up.

bibb, n. Naut. a sidepiece of timber bolted to the hounds of a mast to support the trestletrees.

Well, gosh. I grew up on Navy bases and thought I knew some nautical lingo. Continuing in the dictionary:

hound, n. pl. Shipbuilding The framing at the masthead of a vessel to support the heel of the topmast and the upper parts of the lower rigging.

trestletree, n. Naut. A strong timber fixed on the masthead to support the crosstrees, the frame of the top, and the topmast through the fid; -- chiefly in pl.


Dang. Gotta dig deeper.

masthead, n. The top of a mast, esp. of the lower mast.

heel, n. Naut. The lower end of a mast, a boom, the sternpost, etc.

crosstrees, n. pl. Naut. Two horizontal pieces of timber or metal supported by the trestletrees at a masthead, to spread the upper shrouds to support the mast.

fid, n. Naut. A square bar of wood or iron, used to support the topmast.


Phooey, I give up. Anyone know what a bibb is?
__________________
-- Carl
NN5I is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2015, 11:27 PM   #2
W7JZE
RV in 2016
 
W7JZE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Patterson, CA (CA central Valley east of SF)
Posts: 92
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NN5I View Post
It's not every day that I encounter a word I don't know. When I do, I look it up. This habit has served me well.

Today I encountered a new word, bibb. I looked it up.

bibb, n. Naut. a sidepiece of timber bolted to the hounds of a mast to support the trestletrees.

Well, gosh. I grew up on Navy bases and thought I knew some nautical lingo. Continuing in the dictionary:

hound, n. pl. Shipbuilding The framing at the masthead of a vessel to support the heel of the topmast and the upper parts of the lower rigging.

trestletree, n. Naut. A strong timber fixed on the masthead to support the crosstrees, the frame of the top, and the topmast through the fid; -- chiefly in pl.


Dang. Gotta dig deeper.

masthead, n. The top of a mast, esp. of the lower mast.

heel, n. Naut. The lower end of a mast, a boom, the sternpost, etc.

crosstrees, n. pl. Naut. Two horizontal pieces of timber or metal supported by the trestletrees at a masthead, to spread the upper shrouds to support the mast.

fid, n. Naut. A square bar of wood or iron, used to support the topmast.


Phooey, I give up. Anyone know what a bibb is?
Golly gee Carl. All I've got is hose bibb. A nautical / sailing bibb? HMmmm...

I'm a fairly active recreational sailor since the late 70s. But "bibb" and "hound" and "fid" as nautical terms escape me. "Fid" escapes me regardless of nautical or not!

Yikes!

The rest I'm a little familiar with although I've never crewed on a tall-ship, I've at least heard the words used occasionally.

So shiver me timbers matey and good luck finding (or understanding) your answer before ya' be visiting Davey Jones.

ARGHHHHHhhhhh...

On edit:

ARGHHHHHhhhhh... (Thanks, Radio)
__________________
73,

Bill - W7JZE
"Dar" - XYL
(And our little Bichon Frisť "Sparkle")
W7JZE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 08:00 PM   #3
Radio
Administrator
 
Radio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Fayetteville, GA, USA
Posts: 3,004
Default



Poor little pirate smiley never gets used...
Radio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 03:02 PM   #4
NN5I
Carl, nn5i
 
NN5I's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 1,407
Default

Actually the question was mostly rhetorical, the intent of the message being in the nature of Adlai Stevenson's remark, A funny thing happened to me on the way to the White House ...

Still, lexicographic mysteries exist to be solved. Bibbs, it appears, are used specifically in the structure (at the top of, for example, a mainmast) that supports and holds vertical an additional section of mast (a topmast), which may in turn have similarly attached to its top end a topgallant mast.

The illustration shows bibbs and trestletrees, from an article on model-building.

Note that the dimensions shown seem small; they are for a model of a tall ship.

The topmast attaches to the front face of the mainmast at the head, and the topgallant mast (if present) to the front face of the topmast at its head. If the ship is really tall, or the builders hail from a place with no tall trees, it may have a royal mast above the topgallant.

The bibbs are securely fastened to the sides of the mainmast (to the hounds [see below]) as shown; then the trestletrees sit on the bibbs and extend fore and aft. The crosstrees are longer; they sit on the trestletrees and extend athwartship. The topmast sits on the crosstrees and is fastened to the head of the mainmast.

A hole extends fore-and-aft through the mainmast and topmast. Through this hole, which aligns when the topmast sits on the crosstrees, is placed a timber (or a metal piece) of square or rectangular cross-section, the fid, which is loaded in nearly pure shear and supports most of the vertical load (weight of the topmast and its attachments, plus the resultant of the tensions on the rigging).

Then considerable additional structure is added, supported by the nice long crosstrees, to give men a place to stand and to provide attachment points for the rigging and so forth.

The mast shown in the illustration apparently has no hounds, which would be a layer of timber enclosing (on all four sides) the part of the mast to which the bibbs and topmast are fastened. In the model, the masthead is squared by cutting; on a tall ship it is squared by adding the hounds, which are timbers that are shaped to fit the mast on one side, and flat on the other for attaching the bibbs etc. Thus the mast is strengthened, instead of being weakened, to create flat attachment surfaces.

Two days ago I knew none of this. I think I have it mostly right.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Bibbs & trestletrees.jpg (72.3 KB, 30 views)
__________________
-- Carl
NN5I is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 05:33 PM   #5
Radio
Administrator
 
Radio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Fayetteville, GA, USA
Posts: 3,004
Default

I tried to help but didn't have much luck with words searched so I tried images.

There are bibs that look like faucets to me.
There are bibs that southerners would call waders, the sort of chest high rubber pants that are great for fly fishing and baptizing folks.
And when I got more specific, and asked for "sailboat bibs" I got a bunch of these...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bib.jpg (6.1 KB, 30 views)
__________________

KU4OJ "Wade" Ships Captain, CFO, Chief Engineer
KG4DQQ "Kathy" 1st Officer, Navigator, Best Friend
2007 F-150 SuperCab - 2009 Rockwood 8280SS
Lot's of mostly Kenwood stuff

Radio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 07:15 PM   #6
NN5I
Carl, nn5i
 
NN5I's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 1,407
Default

Try it again with the correct spelling ...
__________________
-- Carl
NN5I is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 11:14 AM   #7
electricflyer
Senior Member
 
electricflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Douglasville, GA
Posts: 417
Default

I used to use a bib when I ate at Gold Star or Skyline Chili in Cincinnati. If you didn't have one there would be spaghetti sauce on your white shirt.
electricflyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 04:36 PM   #8
NN5I
Carl, nn5i
 
NN5I's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 1,407
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by electricflyer View Post
I used to use a bib ... If you didn't have one there would be spaghetti sauce on your white shirt.
I guess it depends on where, and by whom, or perhaps whether, you were taught the use of table implements ...
__________________
-- Carl
NN5I is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 07:14 PM   #9
electricflyer
Senior Member
 
electricflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Douglasville, GA
Posts: 417
Default

Carl, I will assume you have never had Cincinnati style Chili. Many people didn't want to be seen with the bib on but learned to regret it. By the way Skyline chili sauce can be found in most frozen food sections in the grocery store (YUM). Occasionally it can be found with other canned chili.
electricflyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 08:22 PM   #10
Radio
Administrator
 
Radio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Fayetteville, GA, USA
Posts: 3,004
Default

Went out to a lobster bar and they put this HUGE bib on Sweet Wife which made her look like an infant. along with half the church orchestra so she had company.

I don't care much for lobster. I had shrimp, and my dignity.
__________________

KU4OJ "Wade" Ships Captain, CFO, Chief Engineer
KG4DQQ "Kathy" 1st Officer, Navigator, Best Friend
2007 F-150 SuperCab - 2009 Rockwood 8280SS
Lot's of mostly Kenwood stuff

Radio is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.