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Old 05-14-2014, 10:05 AM   #21
NN5I
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Truly the tail wagging the dog.
You meant to say, truly the trail wagging the drag. Right?
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Old 05-27-2014, 01:07 AM   #22
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It's almost always never about whether or not the vehicle can tow it, but rather can it stop it. One ton dually pickups are used as hot shot trucks towing loads over 40k. Difference is that the trailers have brakes that will stop the trucks. Truly the tail wagging the dog. My trailer brakes can stop my 50k motor home.
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You meant to say, truly the trail wagging the drag. Right?
A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away I used to tow a 30 ft travel trailer behind a severely underpowered 1977 Malibu Classic.

There were electric brakes on the TT that I could of course activate from the driver's seat. I could do this independently of whether I was braking the Malibu or not.

The TT brakes would stop the whole rig, albeit slowly... but those electric brakes would stop it. Seems to be a well engineered system. I see above a trailer behind your MH will stop your whole rig.

Not sure how (or if) a car being towed behind a MH has it's brakes applied??? Maybe they don't ??? Cars don't have electric brakes... HMmmm...

I am really naive about this MH stuff. Sorry for the (probably) bone-headed question .
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Old 05-27-2014, 06:16 AM   #23
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They make a system that applies the vehicle brakes with a mechanical/electrical system pretty pricey.
http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/t...FetlOgodTFIADA
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Old 05-27-2014, 07:58 AM   #24
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In my case the air brakes from the coach apply the air brakes on the trailer or toad.
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Old 05-27-2014, 09:27 AM   #25
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Another thing to think about is brakes a full size Lincoln probably is around the 2 1/2 ton mark.
Actually... ANY car you tow, you should put an aux brake system on it.

Ready brake and the blue ox Auto Stop are surge brake systems, Theory has it they should be self adjusting after initial set up,, Clip a cable on and go. (Well 2 cables)

US-Gear Unified Brake Decelerator is an electric/hydrauilc system, Depending on the towed's brake system it will either activate the electric boost pump (Hydro bost) or provide an alternate vacuum source (Vacuum boost) so there is no need to play the press the pedal half a dozen times game.. Plug in one 2-wire cable, and clip on the break-a-way and you are good to tow. Fully adjustable from the Motor driver's seat this unit gives you more control over your towed's brakes than a semi driver has over his trailer brakes.

M&G, if it fits, is an air/hydrauilc for motor homes with air brakes (They make one for non-Air motor homes too) but it may or may not fit, Due to it's design again you do not have to play the press the pedal game.

Many others liek Air Force one, Invisible brakes, and so on, are also quick to hook up and unhook. One time installation only.

Break in a Box systems like Apolo or Brake buddy must be installed EVERY TIME, plus you have to play the press the pedal several times game as part of the install.. Due to the amount of work (not that much but way more than plug/clip) involved it is far too easy to either 1: Say "Oh forget it" for a short trip or 2: Make a mistake, which costs you either a brake job or prevents it from functioning.

Either way I do not recommend them unless you either change towed's often or have a stable fo towed's you pick from every trip.
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Old 05-27-2014, 09:33 AM   #26
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Me, I think it's more fun to spell it toad.
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Old 05-28-2014, 05:27 AM   #27
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NN5I I have to agree that for many towing too much "Trailer" (be it a real trailer or a car towed on either a dolly (most dangerous) or 4 down) can be dangerous.

Yet Semi drivers regularly tow over 20,000 pounds with less than 20,000 pounds of tractor (Way less) and though yes, Jackknifes happen, there are many drivers who have managed to steer around an incident and miss it completly or keep control of their Rigs under very trying conditions... Now.. I do know how they do it academically (not the same as being able to do it myself) but they have the ability to use only part of the brakes.. Trailer brakes can be disabled or engaged without the use of tractor brakes, And some of the tractor's brakes can be disabled as well, by means of controls in the cab.. ONLY one RV braking system gives you anything approaching this level of control (US-Gear Unified Brake Decelerator).. I have not been trained in the proper use of these systems so I can not tell anyone how to do it, but I know people who have used them and managed to keep control of a Semi. Not sure I could do it.

I know all the theory. it is the practice I'm not sure of. And yes, it increases your stopping distance when you use only partial brakes so you need to make sure you follow well behind the folks in front of you.

Another factor in most crashes..... I used to stand on a bridge on occasion and watch the traffic pass below (Pedisterian bridge) and later do the same thing via remote camera (My preferred way to do it, safer) from my office.

I was taught to time from when the car in front of me say goes under a bridge to when I go under, 2 seconds is .. the absolute minimum, 3-4 is better for Motor Homes Im told.

1 is about average for motorists in and around Detroit, some less than that.

It takes 3/4 second for the average person to react or so say my teachers.

If you are 1/2 second behind the car in front of you.... CRASH!
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